Weekly Economic Update – 06/12/2023

The Week on Wall Street

A late-week rally sent stocks into positive territory, with the S&P 500 index closing just shy of the 4,300 mark.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 0.34%, while the Standard & Poor’s 500 added 0.39%. The Nasdaq Composite index improved 0.14% for the week. The MSCI EAFE index, which tracks developed overseas stock markets, rose 0.44%.1,2,3

Stocks Edge Higher

Stocks bumped along the flatline for much of the week ahead of this week’s two inflation reports and the June meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee.

Amid little news, stocks drifted lower to start the week until Wednesday, when a solid early-day rally evaporated on news of the Bank of Canada’s surprise interest rate hike. Stocks rose again the following day, holding onto their gains, with the S&P 500 hitting a new closing high for 2023.4

Stocks added small gains on Friday after weathering some midday weakness, leaving major indices marginally higher for the week.

Better Breadth

One investor concern has been that a handful of mega-cap stocks have driven recent market returns. Last week’s market bucked that trend, with outperformance in small-cap stocks and equally weighted stock market indices.

For instance, the Russell 2000 index (which measures the performance of 2,000 smaller-cap companies) rose 1.90% this week, outpacing the S&P 500 and the technology-heavy Nasdaq.5

Another example of broadening performance was the outperformance of the equally weighted S&P 500 index, where each stock has equal weighting regardless of size, versus the market-cap S&P 500 index, where mega-cap companies disproportionately impact index performance. Last week’s return of the equally weighted S&P 500 index exceeded the cap-weighted S&P 500’s return by 0.65%.6

Weekly Riddle

A common English word refers to a person or thing not being in a place. But just by inserting a space within it, you can get two words meaning that a person or thing is present. What is this word?

Last week’s riddle: A friend wants change for a dollar. All you have in your pocket are over a dollar in coins, but you still can’t make the change correctly. What is the largest amount of money you could have in this situation? What coins do you have that prevent you from making the change correctly? 

Answer: $1.19. Four pennies, four dimes, and three quarters.

John Dombroski Jr. may be reached at (480) 991-1055 or [email protected]
www.grandcanyonplanning.com

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